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PC Medic Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 23 2002,8:27 am QUOTE

For those of you not familiar with Fox Hunting (no RoadKill, not the furry little creatures! :grinnin ), it is a hidden transmitter hunt that is popular mostly with Hams and sounds like a lot of fun.

I'm sure MorseMan will be happy to explain it

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Edited by PC Medic on --

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Morseman Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 24 2002,8:02 am QUOTE

Quote (PC Medic @ Mar. 23 2002,3:27 pm)
For those of you not familiar with Fox Hunting (no RoadKill, not the furry little creatures! :grinnin ), it is a hidden transmitter hunt that is popular mostly with Hams and sounds like a lot of fun.

I'm sure MorseMan will be happy to explain it

--... ...-- .----. ... / - --- / .- .-.. .-.. :^:

Pretty much as was said, you have one person with a transmitter, who is hidden somewhere, and other people use direction finding techniques to find them.

Some people use VHF (Typically 144 MHz) and some use lower frequencies like 1.8MHz, but the theories the same.

Only the person operating the transmitter needs a licence, the hunters often are licenced to transmit, but SWLs (Short Wave Listeners) can hunt as well.

I have a 'whistler' somewhere.  This is a device that goes between a DF antenna and the receiver and outputs a high pitched tone, which decreases (nulls) as you point the antenna towards the transmitter, but you don't have to use one of those.

I wasn't very good at DFing, I got to the transmitter, eventually, but was never the 1st there.

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300mag Offline
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    Posted: April 02 2002,5:00 pm QUOTE

I use to do that alot with cb's in our cars... Depending on your antenna type like a omnidirectional ant... when placed on your vehicle will transmit /receive better in a given direction.ie:if it is located on your right side trunk your antenna (beam) will be receiving/transmiting at the front hood left side of the car. So by moving this corner of the vehicle like turning in circles your signal will raise when pointing in the direction of the transmiter and then go down when leaving it's direction.This way you know what direction the carrier/transmiter is and by looking at your signal meter you can determine roughly the distance. The closer you are the stronger the signal. You can also get a directional or (beam) antenna so instead of turning the vehicle you simply point the antenna .

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barrington Offline
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    Posted: April 02 2002,7:00 pm QUOTE

Fox hunts require a lot of advance preparation and are usually associated with Ham activities like hamfests or club picnics.  They are seldom casual, spur-of-the-moment activities.

It occurred to me that something more akin to geocaching is possible, out in the woods, using VHF receivers and directional antennas, and could be done solo or in a group with no advance preparation, at least here in Western NY!  It seems the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has reintroduced black bears in the area, and most of them are equipped with radio collars....... ;)

Maybe Road Kill could find a new hat! :grinnin

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geowyz Offline
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    Posted: July 05 2003,10:05 pm QUOTE

Does anyone know of any active Foxhunters in the Houston area? I am interested in trying this out but I know nothing about radio stuff and I'm not sure where to start (although I'm a fast learner.) I'm surprised at how sub-par the information on the internet is - most of it assumes a much greater basic knowledge than I have.
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Quinn Offline
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    Posted: July 05 2003,10:29 pm QUOTE

Quote (geowyz @ July 06 2003,12:05 am)
Does anyone know of any active Foxhunters in the Houston area? I am interested in trying this out but I know nothing about radio stuff and I'm not sure where to start (although I'm a fast learner.) I'm surprised at how sub-par the information on the internet is - most of it assumes a much greater basic knowledge than I have.

Hey...how we all get around!  :grinnin

I also have been interested in learning more about this and a fellow from Syracuse seems to be quite the master at information on this topic. I will see if perhaps he knows of a master registry where you can locate a starting point for source in your area.


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Icenians Offline
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    Posted: July 06 2003,3:12 am QUOTE

There was a Geocache fox hunt here in the UK last year for the Children in Need charity event. It was played using gps and mobile phones.

The fox had equipment in the car which would send you a text message with it's lat and lon whenever you sent a text message.

When we used to play this with CB the fox stayed in one place. The gps version had the fox driving around, most of the country in this instance. You had to work out where the fox was heading and try to meet up with it. For the charity event the fox was making himself easy to find so that he could raise money but it could be a lot more difficult if the fox was playing hard to get.
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barrington Offline
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    Posted: July 06 2003,10:58 am QUOTE

Quote
I am interested in trying this out but I know nothing about radio stuff and I'm not sure where to start (although I'm a fast learner.)  


Try arrl.org.  This is the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the primary amateur radio organization in the US.  Also, if your library has a subscription (or donated copies) of QST magazine, try looking through old issues for articles on fox-hunting.


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barrington Offline
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    Posted: May 17 2004,8:04 pm QUOTE

It looks like Fox Hunting (radio direction finding) is a really serious hobby; a National Championship is coming up next month!  Following is copied from "The ARRL Letter" with info and pertinent links.

Barrington


==>USA ARDF CHAMPIONSHIPS COMING TO CALIFORNIA IN MID-JUNE

Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) enthusiasts across the US are
gearing up for the fourth annual national ARDF Championships next month.
ARRL ARDF Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV, says, the sport--also known as
radio-orienteering or foxtailing--is an all-on-foot "adventure in the
woods" to see who can track down and find the most hidden transmitters in
the shortest time. The Santa Barbara Amateur Radio Club (SBARC)
<http://www.sbarc.org> will host the competition. Radio-orienteers from
all over the country plus visitors from abroad are expected to attend.
Moell anticipates a mix of experts and newcomers who aspire to be future
champions. He says equipment need not be elaborate or expensive.

"Most beginners do very well by augmenting their handheld VHF transceivers
with simple Yagi antennas made out of a steel measuring tape and PVC pipe
from the hardware store," he said. For "closing in," he says an offset RF
attenuator consisting of some $15 worth of small parts will knock down the
signal and keep the receiver's S-meter within its scale. "Plans are on the
Web <http://members.aol.com/joek0ov/offatten.html>, and kits are
available, so warm up your soldering iron," he adds.

The ARDF competitive courses are open to anyone of any age and at any
foxhunting skill level. No Amateur Radio license is needed. Medals in the
event will be awarded in five age categories for males and four for
females, in accordance with International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) rules
<http://members.aol.com/homingin/intlfox.html#rules>.

Heading up the USA ARDF Championships is Marvin Johnston, KE6HTS, a
medalist at the last two USA ARDF Championships.

An optional training camp with map-and-compass orienteering kicks off the
ARDF action June 12-13. The main program gets under way Wednesday, June
16. The 2-meter competition takes place Friday, June 18. The 80-meter
competition is the next day.

The California events end just in time for final selection of ARDF Team
USA 2004 members, who will travel to the Czech Republic for the 12th ARDF
World Championships September 7-12. More than 200 participants
representing two dozen or more countries are expected to turn out for the
event. Moell says Team USA's positions will be filled based on
performances in this year's national championships in California and in
last year's national championships in Ohio.

There's more information on the 2004 USA ARDF Championships on the SBARC
Web site <http://www.sbarc.org/ardf/index.shtml>. A downloadable
registration form and additional information are on Moell's "Homing In"
Web site <http://www.homingin.com>.--Joe Moell K0OV


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