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Scout Offline
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Posts: 721
Joined: June 2001
    Posted: April 14 2003,11:42 am QUOTE

Game 21 Results

"Eventually we reached the top of the hill where the paved road
turned entirely to dirt. At this point, the dashpoint was about half
a mile away down the side of the hill. The smart move here would
have been to leave the car at the top of the hill and walk the rest
of the way to the dashpoint..."

Regular readers of Geodashing reports just know what comes next,
don't we?

"Sure enough, when we tried to drive back up the hill, we got bogged
down in the sandy patch. In the end, it took about 10 tries at
various speeds and with my family pushing to get past the sandy bit
and onto the more solid ground."

That's Geodashing with Ted Cabeen. By the way, the "family" Ted
mentioned included his mother-in-law. You gotta love a family that
puts up with some of the things Geodashing leads one to do.

---

"Okay, so I played hooky from my weekend 'job' as ski instructor at
Bluewood to get this dashpoint." -- Tom Moritz

So, there you have it, folks. Proof that Geodashing is more fun than
skiing. ;-)

---

Game 21 of Geodashing was won by GeoTerriers, their fifth win in a
row. Second place went to En Dash! and third place went to Dashed
Hopes. Individual honors went to Jack Frickey.

Game 21 saw 134 dashpoint hunts in seven countries (US, Canada, UK,
Australia, Germany, Belgium, and Japan), including the game's first
ever visit to Japan.

A sampling of spots where Geodashing players found dashpoints:

in a farm in Belgium, only a few kilometers from the confluence of
the Belgian, Dutch, and German borders

on a snowmobile track on a cold and windy field in New York

where the H-1 Interstate Highway viaduct passes over Kamehameha
Highway in Oahu, Hawaii

on a nighttime walk by torchlight down a bridlepath past a pub near
Cambridge, England

in the middle of the "beautiful nowhere" about 4 miles north of a
tiny desert community of Hazen, NV (population somewhere between 5
and 10)

in a mixed wood in Belgium, where Pierre noted the pouillot véloce
and the grive musicienne (The things you learn from Geodashing
players.)

on a short walk through sagebrush and pinion pine and juniper trees,
near the pink cliffs of the Paunsagaunt Plateau, with the sky a
beautiful blue, the wind strong and cold, typical spring-time
weather in south central Utah

in a day care center near Kawakami, just southwest of Yokohama, Japan

on the trotting track of the Bairnsdale Racing Club in the beautiful
and very popular lakes area of Victoria, Australia

at the end of a 4.8 km hike down (and up!) from the crest of
Rattlesnake Hills (897 m) in Washington, with a spectacular view and
tracks of deer and elk

on Sherman Island, at the confluence of the San Joaquin and
Sacramento Rivers in California's San Francisco Bay delta

in the middle of a farmer's field in the Amish country of Ohio

in a California pasture, providing an intimate encounter "up close
and personal" with a lot of cows

within 200 meters of a USGS benchmark (PID FJ0249) in Oklahoma

within 100 meters of the geocache "Autograph Session" in the Cook
County Forest Preserve in Illinois

and in the Melbourne suburb of Doreen:

"'Er name's Doreen ...Well, spare me bloomin' days!
You could er knocked me down wiv 'arf a brick!
Yes, me, that kids meself I know their ways,
An' 'as a name for smoogin' in our click!
I just lines up 'an tips the saucy wink.
But strike! The way she piled on dawg! Yer'd think
A bloke was givin' back-chat to the Queen....
'Er name's Doreen."

-- CJ Dennis (The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke)

That's Geodashing with Dashing Dog Mac. The things you learn from a
dog.

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

=========

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The
win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can
get to them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making
each game different and unpredictable. For more information and to
play, visit http://Geodashing.org .

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    Posted: May 20 2003,11:01 am QUOTE

Game 22 Results

Do you ever find yourself in some unremarkable part of town,
watching your GPSr count down to zero, then triumphantly snap a
photo of ..., well, the neighborhood Video Ezy shop? If an unknown
bystander turns, looks at you in amazement and says, "Geez mate, you
must be hard-up for a photo!", then you must be Geodashing in
Melbourne with Dashing Dog Mac and Dashing Dog's Mum.

---

Game 22 of Geodashing was won by GeoTerriers, their sixth win in a
row. Second place went to En Dash! and third place went to
arbitrary_intentions. Individual honors went to Dashing Dog Mac and
Dashing Dog's Mum. In the unofficial country championship, Australia
put up a real challenge to the USA's winning streak, losing out only
in the last few days, perhaps because of a premature mention of
Australia's lead.

Game 22 saw 188 dashpoint hunts in seven countries (US, Canada,
Brazil, UK, Germany, Australia and New Zealand).

A sampling of spots where Geodashing players found dashpoints:

in the parking lot of an Oklahoma muffler shop, scored by Chiri
Totsu's beatnik at midnight on May 1

in a Nottinghamshire field ("good old Robin Hood country"),
protected from close approach in all but one direction by the
windiest bit of the River Greet

under a 132kV overhead line between pylons numbered PWN131 and
PWN132 (Morseman notices all things electric)

in a UK quarry reached after two hours of exploring a warren of
tracks, leading to endless reversing sessions as the routes tended
to follow ridges only about 8 ft wide with large drops either side

in the bedroom of the Norton's house on Ruggles street near the
mouth of the Genesee River on Lake Ontario (scored by 'Darcy the
Dasher', whose chicken pox may have kept her out of school, but not
in bed!)

in Castro Valley, California, somewhere in the vast maze of the I-
580/I-238 cloverleaf (visited by just about everyone in California,
it seems)

79 meters into California's San Luis Reservoir (visited by lots of
catfish, presumably)

in an unremarkable grass paddock in New Zealand covered with lots of
fresh sheep droppings and enough pine cones to make a nice lounge
fire

in the briar-infested mosquito capital of the world, otherwise known
as the Southeast Wasmasaw Hunting Club of South Carolina ("I think
that the mosquitos were trying to lift us up like the monkeys in the
Wizard of OZ!")

down a 4-wheeler trail in Alabama's Fox Creek Hunting Club

in a very flooded creek way out in the country in Southampton
County, Virginia, about a mile from the site of Nat Turner's
Rebellion

on a one-lane dirt track very near Virginia's Appalachian Trail

in Michigan's Manistee National Forest, visited after an ice storm,
which luckily left the route more muddy than snowy

in DeKalb, Illinois, where years before Markwell's father tested his
navigational skills when learning to drive by challenging him to
find his way home with no maps, no hints. ("Little did either my
father or I suspect that it would prepare me for one of my adult-
life hobbies.")

in the shingle flats of New Zealand's Hurunui River, a "great river
for trout and salmon fishing - grade 3 rapids for the kayakers"

on the western slope of Washington's Cascade Mountains, in forest
lush with moss on the pine trees

past a lonely cemetery on top of a small hill and a mile and a half
beyond a fence in northeast Colorado, where the road ran out

in the desert of California, where in Spring can be seen hundreds of
tiny white flowers and numerous small purple flowers per square foot
covering the desert landscape.

at the end of a 1.5 mile hike across volcanic rock in California's
desert

in Australia's Mount Napier National Park, 650m from a road across
ground covered with rough volcanic rocks, overgrown with grass and
bracken up to chest height

in an Australian paddock whose gate was guarded by sheep and whose
skies were guarded by hundreds of sulphur crested cockatoos

in blackberry bushes along a disused railway in Victoria, on a route
guarded by a five foot long copperhead snake ("at eye level, coiled
with its head raised above the ground and with its beady eyes fixed
on me")

in a clump of manzanita brush amidst the beautiful Ponderosa pine
trees very near to Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park

in the middle of a block of houses a short walk from London's
Wimbledon station

about 700 feet (at about 6600 feet) above the road at the end of a
very narrow, rocky path in the bottom of a narrowing canyon in
Nevada, with a magnificent view of the canyon and Castle Peak across
the canyon

and 23 dashpoints in Victoria and South Australia, visited by
Dashing Dog Mac and Dashing Dog's Mum in a mad dash across 3,028
kilometers of southeastern Australia, spotting hundreds or thousands
of kangaroos, cockatoos, and pelicans, five wineries, and crickets
in plague proportions

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

=========

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The
win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can
get to them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making
each game different and unpredictable. For more information and to
play, visit http://Geodashing.org .

--------------
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    Posted: June 15 2003,8:38 pm QUOTE

Game 23 results

"This dash point is near a place called Fish Lake. The temp was cool with a breeze that made it cold. There was still some snow on the ground.  Quite a bit more than I was expecting. But we headed out. We were able to avoid the snow for about a .25 of a mile across a dam and then that is when it got ugly. This is when Dia decided to head back to the truck. So she was off and I was thinking about it.  But I decided that I could make it. So I started up the hill. Hill Ha. This was a cliff. I climbed a little over a 1,000 ft. in under .04 of a mile and not only was it steep but there were snow drifts that hit me about mid-shin. I was able to pick my way through the snow most of the time but not always.  The trees and dead fall got really thick at times, a couple of times I had to backtrack and go around when it got so thick. I would lose the signal and have to stop and hold my GPS just right and then move on. It took me over an hour to get back to the truck just over 1.5 mile round trip. But it was beautiful to be at the top of that hill.  To see the lake half frozen and the white snow all around. A good adventure."

That's Geodashing with Bryce Mower in Utah.  Geodashing sometimes leads you to waypoints located in places only the brave dare to go. And they aren't always in wilderness areas.

"Located in a residential area of north-east Toronto: the denizens of this region calling the place 'Scarborough'. It is a place where urban exiles are sent. Some even like it. Every city has one. We ventured into this wasteland of tract-housing, industrial 'parks', garbage-dumps, excuse me, 'transfer stations', train yards, and related detritus of our post-modern, mechanized, chemicalized, technologized civilization by the apropos guidance of a GPS receiver.  Navigation otherwise is impossible, with there being no natural or unnatural landmarks from which to extract cues. Being Scarborough, we did not find a single human being. The entire city seems to be living on an unspoken curfew. Even in the middle of the day, to be found walking on a sidewalk in Scarborough is a deeply suspicious activity. A permanent, yet completely undeclared, lockdown.  This is Scarberia. Please do not make me go there again."

That's Geodashing with Walang Pangalan in Toronto. Finally, difficult as it is to believe, there are some places that not even Jack Frickey will go.

"According to the map the dashpoint lies right on Mecca Ave. as it nears its end in the Santa Monica mountains. When we got there, we discovered that the dashpoint was about a quarter mile east.  Not to be thwarted, I donned full rain gear and a head lamp for my nighttime, rain-soaked assault on GD23-AJUZ. With still .17 miles to go, the bottom dropped out from under me to reveal a steep canyon disappearing below. I may be adventurous, but not crazy (well make that not stupid). There was no way I could safely negotiate the steep canyon wall in the dark in the rain."

---

Game 23 of Geodashing was won by GeoTerriers, their seventh win in a row.  Second place went to Team GPS and third place went to Chiri Totsu.  Individual honors went to Jack Frickey, with a second place tie going to Dashing Dog Mac and Dashing Dog's Mum.

Game 23 saw 161 dashpoint hunts in seven countries (US, UK, Australia, Zambia, Canada, Brazil and France). The month saw the game's first ever visit to a dashpoint in Maine, leaving only Alaska, South Dakota and the District of Columbia unvisited.

A sampling of spots where Geodashing players found dashpoints:

on Zambia's Kafue River, site of the annual "River Lure" fishing competition, a "boat-by".

300 metres past the top of the UK's Wharncliffe Craggs, an area of rocky cliffs, through trees, across a stream, and down the craggs.

a short walk from the Edithvale Railway Station, a suburb of Melbourne (a "train-by").

along a deer trail in the Redwood forest north of Ben Lomand, California.

on a heavily wooded slope overlooking Shasta Dam and the Sacramento River.

100 meters from the base of the steep eastern slope of the Sierra crest with gorgeous views of the snow capped Sierras, surrounded by wildflowers and too close to thirty active beehives to be comfortable.

up a canyon in the mountains forming the western border of the California central valley, origin of much of the nation's produce, including carrots, lettuce and spinach found to be "yummy."

1000 feet above the middle fork of California's American River, crossed on the 3rd highest bridge in the world, some 700 feet above the river below.

near Washington's Juniper Dunes Wilderness.

0.61 km into Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats, long famous for providing a hard, flat surface used by race-car drivers and land speed record seekers, but currently more likely to be marsh and mud.

in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the Pike National Forest, along a trail that is no more, its trailhead replaced by a new house.

on the top of a hill on the general path of New York's Old Portage Trail, near a beautiful sunset overlook of Lake Erie.

six dashpoints visited by Dave Hinns in Le Grand Dash Francais in places like Calais, Orleans, Poitiers, and Niort.

and twelve drive-bys (marked yellow on the map) spread from the south of Victoria through the central goldfields to the Murray River at the northern boundary of the state. On the map they sparkled like gold, all visited on a weekend of 'dashing and discovering, staying in delightful dog-friendly Bed and Breakfasts, an important careabout for Dashing Dog Mac.

=========

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit http://Geodashing.org .


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    Posted: July 06 2003,10:06 pm QUOTE

Game 24 results

So, are stereotypes deserved or not? Visits to random waypoints shed some new light on the question:

"I always used to laugh when people depict Texas as being completely covered with ranches and oil wells, because I've lived my whole life in Houston, Austin, and Waco, Tx and I rarely saw either.  But now that I've visited Texas randomly... the stereotype is actually quite close to the truth! Take down all the barbed wire, and most of Texas is just one big ranch."

That's Geodashing in Texas with Peeve.

---

Game 24 of Geodashing was won by GeoTerriers, their eighth win in a row.  Second place went to En Dash! and third place went to Trailblazers.  Individual honors went to Jack Frickey, second to David Mower and third to Ash Doge and Just a Short Walk, in a tie. Only one point out of the money was Wanderer.

Game 24 saw 132 dashpoint hunts in five countries (US, UK, Australia, France, and Germany).

A sampling of spots where Geodashing players found dashpoints:

at California's General Stilwell Community Center, in the building where Just a Short Walk's SCUBA club holds it monthly meetings (seaotters, anyone?)

on the grounds of the "California Air National Guard Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site", where there were no signs forbidding entrance, but the sounds of explosions and automatic weapons fire encouraged one not to tarry nevertheless

in a "4x4 heavenly play area" in England's Huntsman Quarry, near "a large green box that I think was an explosives store"

at 9300 feet in Colorado's Pike National Forest, where the sun was warm, the fragrance of sage sweet and the view of the mountains panoramic

at 10,400 ft in the Ptarmigan Peak wilderness area near Silverthorne, Colorado, on a trail that wound through dense Lodgepole pine forest, stands of young Aspens, and a profusion of yellow wildflowers

in the Hayman burn area of Colorado's Pike National Forest, where grass and wildflowers are returning between the burned trunks of dead evergreens

on a farm in the county of Rutland, England, the "disappearing county with disappearing villages"

in an alfalfa field in Utah, with the cut alfalfa lying in windrows waiting for bailing

in the Utah sagebrush, where the air was smoky and the sunset very orange from a distant grass fire

a mile and a half walk across Nevada's Eightmile Flat, sometimes covered with crusty, crunchy, crinkly white salt, sometimes with moist but solid slippery smooth mud

in a Minnesota cornfield, where the corn has to grow some to be knee high by the Fourth of July.

in a field of green peas in Washington, irrigated by a center pivot sprinkler device, estimated to have a radius of 400 meters

on various California farms: in a peach orchard, in a walnut orchard, in a field of kiwi fruit vines, in a vinyard and in a field of squash

on the top of a 40 foot high cliff in California, past a field of grazing llamas and a beaver pond

east of Austin, Texas, directly across the highway from a sign marking the 1839 Battle of Brushy Creek, the last major battle between the settlers and the Comanche tribe in this county

in rain-foresty woods on the big island of Hawaii, where the footing was unstable lava rock

eight miles of bushwhacking from the nearest road in the foothills of Oregon's Mt Hood (zero points!)

0.31 miles from the nearest road in New York's marshy Montezuma's Wildlife Refuge, site of the first Bald Eagle restoration project in the United States (zero points)

in a meadow on one of the biggest battlefields of the Ardennes offensive in Huertgenwald, Germany, on Nov 2nd, 1944

in a residential area of Gelsenkirchen, Germany

and in the dense forest east of Melbourne, where "the mountains were shrouded in light mist which hung like cottonwool to the tall, majestic eucalypts and tree ferns" (zero points, unfortunately, as the timber trail turned to mud and slush well short of the dashpoint)

Does the following conversation sound the least bit familiar? If so, call yourself a Geodashing veteran.

"After breaking camp on Sunday morning, I turned to SWMBO and said,
'How crabby are you?'
'I'm not really. What did you have in mind?'
'Mind if we take a little detour for a dashpoint?'
'Sure. Why not.'
I love my wife."

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original reports are available on the Web site.

=========

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit http://Geodashing.org .


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    Posted: July 06 2004,8:31 am QUOTE

Game 36 results

"Feeling somewhat frazzled from too much work, I prescribed for
myself an immediate session of geotherapy and set off around
sunset to visit the nearest June dashpoint."

... That's Geodashing with Ash Doge. We're not just wasting
 time. It's geotherapy.

Game 36 of Geodashing began with a midnight trip to a dashpoint
a mere 1,592.63 meters from Peeve's front door. He reported the
score only eight minutes after midnight (and gave thanks to the
llamas for sparing his apartment from being crushed by that
dashpoint landing any closer).

Game 36 was won by Team GPS, breaking a three game winning
streak by Llama League, who finished second, only one point
ahead of Geoterriers.

Individual honors went to BOB!!, only two points ahead of Jack
Frickey.  In third was Tom Arneson.

Game 36 saw 160 dashpoint hunts in five countries, including
Australia, Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United
States.

======

A random sample of this game's random dashpoints:

in Utah's Dixie National Forest, where the sky is blue, the
surrounding forest dark green, and the cliffs of the Paunsagaunt
Plateau are pink.

at the base of some giant boulders at 11,332 feet, along a steep
trail up Colorado's Tarryall Mountains, reached via a 12.2 mile
(round trip) hike

a short hike into the forest of Oregon's Deschutes National
Forest, about 2km from Lava Butte, a prominent cinder cone,
which is part of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument

up a basalt cliff in an Oregon wildlife refuge above Lake
Wallula, a lake in the Columbia River created by McNary Dam.

three miles along a major trail on the north face of the Santa
Ynez in California's Los Padres National Forest

over a small ridge and down in a creek bed, among the mountain
cedars and scrub oak of the Texas hill country

under some Aspens near a large meadow at 10,300 ft, offering a
magnificent view of Colorado's Mount of the Holy Cross.

on a ridge in Australia's Fraser National Park, off a hilly dirt
road built for fire-fighting purposes that offers spectacular
views

down the slope and through the thick undergrowth at the edge of
the national forest at the end of a wet and muddy, unnamed "Dry
Weather Only" road in Victoria, Australia

80 meters up a craggy Canadian Shield bedrock hill in Ottawa's
Gatineau Park

across Watersaw Rake footpath in the Peak District in
Derbyshire, England, guarded by the steep terrain of Longstone
Edge

in New York's Rockefeller State Park Preserve, part of what used
to be the Rockefeller family estate in Pocantico Hills, New
York, just east of Sleepy Hollow.

in a New York state fish hatchery

on Treasure Island, halfway across the San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge, offering a spectacular view of the San Francisco
skyline.

in a grass field in Oregon's Willamette Valley, known for its
grass seed, supplying the world with lawns, playing fields, golf
courses and pastures.

just off a dirt road in Iowa, with corn in all directions, about
2 feet tall.

in a recently cut hayfield in Hall Country, Georgia, the
self-proclaimed chicken capital of the world

in a soy bean field near New Munich, Minnesota, where farmers
were harvesting silage, stored in mounds on the ground covered
with plastic sheeting

on a hill in New York, 300 meters from Christ Episcopal Church,
built 1782, and burial place of James Daune, member of the first
Continental Congress

in the lovely yard of a small, brick, ranch-style home in
Virginia, with a brass door knocker inscribed "The Lambs" and a
long-haired white cat lounging in the doorway. The dashpoint
name? GD36-COZY, of course ;-)

in the wilderness of the Dutch-German borderland, just three
meters south of the border (depending on whether a dashpoint is,
in fact, a point or a circle -- luckily our reporter was on
solid ground (OK, muddy ground in the ditch that marks the
border here) so we don't have to consider cylinders and spheres
and altitude).

just off the end of runway 10 at the Waukesha, Wisconsin
airport, scored by air in a Piper Cherokee at an altitude of 98
meters.

in a bakery in the small village of Dümpelfeld. The bakery was
closed, but on the other side of the street, still in scoring
range, was a cafe with delicious cappucino cake.

in a Houston neighborhood off Airport Blvd, where the houses are
one-story and pretty run-down and the residents either have lots
of visitors or own lots of cars, parked in the street, in
driveways, in yards, everywhere.

on a hilltop in West Virginia, along a gravel road following a
creek bed, and near a somewhat run-down house in the woods
guarded by two sorry looking dogs, so thin that you could see
their ribs

in an empty, unfenced lot near Adelanto, California, between a
prison and what looks like a chemical plant

in a wood near the UK village of Erlestoke, past the George and
Dragon pub.

in the inside northbound lane of I-95 just north of Baltimore,
Maryland.

500 feet from land in Maryland's Chesapeake Bay, visited with
the help of a kindly landowner, who ferried the Geodashing
passengers to the dashpoint in his ski boat (you meet the nicest
people Geodashing ...)

in a suburban Virginia woods, where a neighbor tells of kids and
motorcycles going through there and how much the neighbors hate
it (... just don't push their hospitality too far ;-)

and, finally, no dashpoints on the open sea, where Aquadyne
finds himself during a seven month deployment with the US Navy,
sailing the Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean and the Persian
Gulf. Take care out there.

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports
are quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete,
original reports are available on the Web site.

=========

"Hillside Drive.  It has no right being considered a road.  I
have been on better tracks in national forests.  One lane wide
and full of holes.  However, there really are houses at the end
of it."

... That's Geodashing with Michael Head. Remember, getting
 there is all the fun.

"My wife's Camry survived the trip, about 80 miles of which was
on desert dirt roads. High clearance?  We don't need no stinkin'
high clearance!"

... That's Geodashing with Chaosmanor. Remember, getting there
 is all the fun.

"I really enjoyed ripping the gas, drifting and sliding along
the muddy and sandy way (it had rained in the night), until the
way made a sudden turn into really soft sand and mud. I managed
to stop, but my already muddy boot didn't find a halt on the
soft and slippery ground, not to mention the tires (which are
old - I need new ones soon), and so Baghira and I both took a
good bath in a big mudhole. Now we had mud all over us. I must
have looked like the Monster from the Moor."

-- That's Geodashing with Enduromaniac. Remember, getting
 there... you know the rest.

"'Warrior 345: You are clear for landing on runway 10.' Exactly
what we were hoping for. We were actually within the magic
circle of scoring as we landed. We came in at 97 meters, and (I
checked with the track log and the adjusted altimeter) about 98
meters in the air. Cool."

-- Now THAT'S Geodashing with Markwell.

=========

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected.
The win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if
you can get to them at all! Each game has a new set of
dashpoints making each game different and unpredictable. For
more information and to play, visit
http://geodashing.gpsgames.org .


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    Posted: Aug. 05 2004,12:18 pm QUOTE

Results: Geodashing Game 37

"I noticed that the first half mile was typical desert terrain, bugs, birds, scrub; between 1/2 mile to 1 mile in only bugs were visible.  After that first mile, no life at all. Just crystallized salt and hardened earth. I was in one of the most barren and lifeless places on earth."

That's Geodashing with YLO_RLR in Death Valley.

"I got to about 9.2 km from the DP when I decided to turn around as the road was getting too difficult for my 2-wheel drive car. In the process of turning around I got stuck in the sandy soil. After a few tries to get out I realised I needed more help. It was near sunset and I was 6 km off the highway, but I had my bike. I used it to get back to I-82 and to the truck weighing station where I called a friend to come to rescue me.  We came back and got the car out this morning. Zero points for this one.  If I were to try again. I'd try a boat ..."

That's Geodashing in Washington with Tom Arneson.

"This one we actually swooped 3 times to make sure. The first time we came in at about 400 feet, and flew right over the point, but at 400 feet I couldn't claim scoring. We swooped again, but this time swerved to the south of the point - within the 300 foot elevation, but not within the 300 foot distance from the point. Third time was indeeed a charm, as we got within 11 meters of the point, and had the altitude of 266 feet (81 m)."

That's Aero-Dashing by Piper Cherokee with Markwell.

======

Game 37 of Geodashing was won by Llama League, returning to the victor's circle after a one game absence.  Team GPS took second place and new team Dash Vader finished third.

Individual honors went to new champion pllasstic, followed in second by the always reliable Jack Frickey. Douq Millar took third.

Game 37 saw 237 dashpoint hunts in ten countries, including Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, United Kingdom, United States, and the game's first attempt in Uruguay.

======

A random sample of this game's random dashpoints:

on the top of the western face of a sheer cliff 150-200 feet high outside Santa Paula, California

a few hundred feet from the second largest granite dome in Texas' Enchanted Rock State Park

in the ocean just off the Maine coast

in a swimming pool in Maryland

on the boundary of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park in Maryland

off limits on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation in Washington State, where plutonium was made during the Cold War

in the German village of Bocket, between the village church, the pub, the cash-machine and the grocery store

to the rear of a farm at 16 Claylands Road, Whitwell, Worksop which is in Nottinghamshire but has a Sheffield post code (all clear?)

in an Illinois bean field, near some entity called Saratoga Center -- "I can't see ANYTHING that looks like the center of ANYTHING here.  there was NOTHING out here but corn, beans and worms."

in the heart of Chicago where I-57 starts as a spin-off of I-90/94, in no way one of the best neighborhoods in the City of Chicago

in a soggy North Dakota wheat field

in an impossibly dense cornfield in Nebraska

in a Texas field with two oil wells, guarded by a small herd of killer attack cows and some very piqued bulls

under some California Redwood trees, near a driveway on which was parked an enormous white SUV, whose nose was just sticking into a garage that was obviously too small for it

in the yard of a rundown shack, down a dirt track in a rural village in South Africa, dotted with wood and tin stalls selling anything from live chickens to single cigarettes and quarts of beer

near an old unkempt cemetery on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation in New Mexico

at the edge of wild raspberry thicket in Virginia

at the edge of a woods in a switchback of the North Fork of Virginia's Shenandoah River

on a nature preserve down a dirt road near Rome, New York, past the "Please Slow Butterflies" sign, where all the butterflies seemed to be of normal speed.

near the shore of Texas' Stillhouse Hollow, where driving across the dam provides a stunning view of the lake

in a small vineyard on the banks for the Mosel River, near the town of Mülheim, Germany

in an experimental vineyard belonging to the University of Pisa, through an ornate gateway and up a long driveway towards a pink villa on the hill

in a field of yellow flowers just off the Trans-Canada highway in Saskatchewan

in a German meadow full of wonderful smelling Eifel herbs

among huge heaps of sand and stones in a German quarry formed from the inner cone of an inactive volcano

near a field of grazing llamas just outside a house in Monument, Colorado, with a second floor porch supported by columns made from the trunks of Lodge Pole Pine trees,

on the rolling plains of Uruguay, dotted with occasional sheep and cows

in a UK cornfield, next to Slimbridge, the wetlands trust, a bird watchers' paradise

on a New Mexico plateau, flat with lots of cedar trees and sage brush, home of American antelope

in a nature reserve in southern Brazil near where five rivers join together and then flow into the Lagoa dos Patos, South America's largest lake

down a wild horse trail on Washington's Yakama Indian Reservation, at the end of a 4.6 km hike in 100F (38C) temperature

and in South Africa's Kruger National Park, past a large bull giraffe in the road

======

"We made it half an hour north of Milwaukee when the deer jumped in front of the Dashmobile that was doing about 70 mph at the time.  That kind of put a damper on everything."

That's Geodashing with FWDDriver. Thankfully, no humans were hurt. Each year, vehicles collide with 45,000 deer on highways in Wisconsin alone.  Be careful out there.

======

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected.  The win goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit http://geodashing.gpsgames.org .


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Scout  ( http://GPSgames.org )
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