Forum: GeoDashing
Topic: Game 110
started by: Scout

Posted by Scout on Sep. 04 2010,4:32 pm
Results: Geodashing Game 110 (GDAK)

"On the way to the dashpoint in the Gila River Indian Reservation, we
crossed paths with a coyote and a hawk. We parked and followed on foot
the two track road off into the desert.  The weather was anomalous,
overcast, windy, 80 F with a rain storm earlier in the morning.  In
fact, the ground was still wet.  Patrick said this was an amazingly
rare occurrence. About 100m down the road,we headed off cross country,
weaving amongst the sage brush and mesquite.  The ground was pocked
with holes, ranging in size from an inch to 10 inches.  Who knows what
lived in them, but we saw a few flickers of movement into the holes.
Patrick got his first taste of Geodashing and the Geodashing dance as
he tried to zero the point."

That's Geodashing in Arizona with deodasher

"When AHOT appeared in the middle of the Badlands, I knew it would be
this month's dashing trip. The area has great hiking, exploring,
photography and geocaching. No two trips are the same.  The best time
to visit the Badlands is late fall through early spring. Summer is too
HOT. I decided instead on a sunrise outing when I could see where I am
stepping and the temperatures are pleasant. The dashpoint is about 500
m north of two prominent volcanic pressure ridges, Flatiron Rock and
The Castle.  Views of the Cascades were poor because of a forest fire
to the northwest, but the air here was clear and the early morning
light on the juniper trees and lava flows was delightful. Even more
noticeable in the early morning is the quiet. Only the wing beat of an
occasional bird interrupts the stillness. There is so little
background noise that if I had put my head down to the ground I
imagine I could hear the ants walking. At the dashpoint on a rocky
mound surrounded by trees, boisterous pinyon jays floated back and
forth. They knew the cool hours of morning were the time to be active.
With the sun up the temperature was already 70 F by 8 AM, so we needed
to head back. I left an X made of sticks at ground zero."

That's Geodashing in Oregon with geodasher

"The dashpoint was in a remote property called Balnacoil and the sign
on the gate said Private Road. We drove in to meet the owner to seek
permission for our quest.  The first person we met was Tom, who wore a
tweed coat, had bright ginger hair and rosy cheeks - the epitome of
the Scottish country squire. I explained Geodashing to him and he
said, "Have you come 16,000 kilometers from Melbourne just to find
this point on this property?".  Tom said that there should be no
problem but that I should check with the owner, whose name was John.
John then appeared from the mist in a form of four-wheel drive mini
farm vehicle and hopped out and shook my hand.  John was very
enthusiastic and accommodating, once I had answered the ubiquitous
question 'How many other geodashers will there be coming to visit this
point?' I showed John and Tom on the map where I needed to go (about
600 metres up a hill on a rough track), and they said to go for it on
foot, as the track worsened further up the hill.  Then they went into
town and left us to it, waving delightedly as they left. I reached 34
metres at the top of the ridge and had magnificent views of Scottish
moors resplendent with green ferns and purple heather, with pristine
streams flowing through glens to the main river in the valley."

That's Geodashing in Scotland with Dashing Dog Mac

==================================

Game 110 (GDAK) of Geodashing was won by team "GeoTerriers". Honorable
mentions go to "Llama League" and "Home for the Itinerant."

Individual honors go to Jack Frickey. Honorable mentions go to
McMeanderer and RogBarn.

The game saw 62 dashpoint hunts in seven countries (US, UK, Estonia,
Germany, Netherlands, Austria and Australia).

==================================

A sampling of waypoints visited by Geodashing players this month:

along a trail through the forest in Estonia, where there were lots of
delicious berries and mushrooms and a barn for feeding wild animals in
winter

in a dry meadow of Rocky Oaks Park in the Santa Monica Mountains
National Recreation Area, near one of the tunnels through which Kanan
Road passes on its way to Pacific Coast Highway

in Amsterdam, behind a pizzeria that announced Surinamese food as well
and with a menu of pizzas and Greek foods!

on unimproved land of Utah's Levan Wildlife Management Area, among
grass, sagebrush and juniper trees ("I enjoyed the lovely orange glow
imparted by the long rays of the setting sun.")

unreachable in a corn field in Minnesota, which has had plenty of rain
and hot and sunny days to make for an excellent growing season

in Silver Spring, Maryland, across the street from a brick house with
red gables and purple trim and near a "Jesus es el Senor" church in an
office building

in the side yard of a small one story blue home in Kansas, along with
a trampoline and a boat and trailer

in Ohio, behind a detached three-bay garage of a house on the shore of
Lake Erie

under a tree in a field near a garage where the owner restores
vintage cars, including a 1940 pearl white "souped up" Ford Roadster

after a 130m bushwhack through old growth forest in Oregon, from where
the North Fork of the Breitenbush River can be heard but not seen

on a small, weed-covered hill along the edge of a Doubletree Hotel's
parking lot near San Francisco Airport

among sagebrush and weeds near an abandoned airport in Roosevelt, Utah

in a paddock in Sunbury, Victoria, Australia, with a pony and a
circular fence enclosing a small sand arena

and in the village of Duxford, England, very near an attractive little
pub with a thatched roof

==================================

PLMerry offers these words of wisdom:

"It was while at this DP I finally figured out my the distances in
DeLorme Street Atlas were not ticking off as quick as I thought they
should.  I lent my laptop to my daughter last month for a trip that
she was taking.  It appears that she switch from Km to miles.  When
winding through the country hitting EarthCaches, DP, and Vexilla
points there is a big difference between 130 Km and 130 miles."

==================================

Thanks to all the Geodashing players, whose many great reports are
quoted here, not always with proper attribution. Complete, original
reports are available on the Web site.

==================================

About Geodashing: Geodashing is a game in which players use GPS
receivers on a playing field that covers the entire planet. The
waypoints, or dashpoints, to be reached are randomly selected. The win
goes to who can get to the most dashpoints; that is, if you can get to
them at all! Each game has a new set of dashpoints making each game
different and unpredictable. For more information and to play, visit
< http://GPSgames.org > .

Powered by Ikonboard 3.1.2a
Ikonboard © 2001 Jarvis Entertainment Group, Inc.