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Topic: Moving caches< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
NJ Approver Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,9:30 am QUOTE

Hi!
Went out to find my first navicache (the only one within 25 miles of me) today. It's listed as a traveling cache (50 states)I looked all over and it wasn't there. There was nothing on the cache page to indicate the cache wasn't where it said it was. I came home and logged on the cache page that I didn't find it. My log was deleted by the cache owner and I got a sorta nasty email from him. I see now he added a note that the cache isn't really there, but that wasn't there until after he deleted my log. Since geocaching.com doesn't allow these types of caches anymore, I had never found one before. Shouldn't there be some sort of system in place to alert navicache seekers that caches like this are not there? I see a huge potential for damage to the environment and lots of general frustration when a cache hider sends people looking for a cache he knows isn't there. Is this how it's supposed to work?
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Scout Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,10:08 am QUOTE

You said you logged a did-not-find and suggested the cache was gone. The cache owner then added a note to that effect. I don't approve of him deleting your own note or sending nasty emails, but other than that, it sounds like the system worked.

P.S. Anyone interested in moving caches that seem to be working well, check out http://poker.gpsgames.org .


Edited by Scout on Mar. 17 2004,10:11 am

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PC Medic Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,1:03 pm QUOTE

Traveling / Moving caches have one major drawback (which you have just found). That is that sometimes someone may go looking when someone else just ahead of them has already made a find and removed it. Bummer yes, but then searching for Moving caches is for this reason a 'you have been warned' type of adventure.

Now as for potential to damage the enviroment, they pose no more a threat that than a traditional cache and in my opinion probably less. For one thing, they are in the area a very short time. Also, no matter what type of cache one seeks any 'responsible' cacher will take care in not disturbing the area while searching, and just like a traditional will give up after a certain period of time and trouble. In fact, because it is listed as a "Moving" cache most will with good reason even give up sooner figuring someone beat them to it.

Now to further reduce problems two things should take place with all moving caches.

When one leaves in search of a Moving cache they should always enter a log note to the cache page indicating this. This will help prevent others heading out behind you only to arrive after it has been removed. If you find a moving cache, then you should log the find as soon as possible .and if the cache has been placed at a new location, the new coordinates should be included in that log. If you could not find it then you should probably enter a 'Note' log that you were unable to find it so that if no one reports a find the owner can be made aware that the cache may be missing.

As for the cache owner, upon receiving the cache log notification with the new coordinates, the cache owner is then 'required' to update the coordinates in the cache page  so that a new map can be generated and the database search feature can be updated.


Edited by PC Medic on Mar. 17 2004,3:48 pm

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'PC Medic'
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YardBoy Offline
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Posted: Mar. 17 2004,4:03 pm QUOTE

Quote (NJ Approver @ Mar. 17 2004,11:30 am)
...Went out to find my first navicache

Welcome!  For your first NaviCache, I think you're a great communicator, possibly better than the cache owner or whoever didn't follow the "Traveler" process. Your enlightenment will help all of us to improve the sport.  I suspect you'll post when you take a hitchiker from a cache so the rest of us don't go on a wild goose chase.  I bet you'll post the number of shots left on a disposable camera so the owner can make plans to replace it.  Hell, you'll probably post your cache trade so the rest of us know what we're after.

Please let us know the name of this NaviCache so we can monitor its situation.  Thanks again!


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What's the difference between ignorance & apathy?
I don't know, nor do I care!
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PC Medic Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,4:18 pm QUOTE

Quote (NJ Approver @ Mar. 17 2004,11:30 am)
Hi!
Went out to find my first navicache (the only one within 25 miles of me) today. It's listed as a traveling cache (50 states)I looked all over and it wasn't there. There was nothing on the cache page to indicate the cache wasn't where it said it was.

I almost forgot....
When you say "there was nothing on the page to say the cache wasn't where it said it was" had you forgotten that "it's listed as a traveling cache"? Or is it that as an approver over on GC.com where they are not permitted you were just unaware of how traveling caches sometimes travel??


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Quinn Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,8:34 pm QUOTE

I agree with Medic on the topic of damage to the land. A moving cache will do far less damage to the land it was placed in than a fixed location cache will.

I have seen massive trails formed from cachers going to and from a cache hot spot. this type will allow the areas it has been placed to recover quite quickly if any harm at all.

You are right that it can be frustrating to go after it and see that it has been moved already, but this is something that each cacher joining in this type of hunt already knew could happen.

By the way, I have seen in my area of upstate ny over 50 micro caches placed in a tight area by a single user in just a matter of weeks. these caches are sometimes no more than a small cup with a slip of paper in it just to call it a cache. caches like these when approved tend to do far more harm than anything else as they are more-so just clutter to both the lands and sites.

micro caches can be great fun if they are planned out to be so. But do not just dump one out in the world just so you can say you placed a cache.


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Scout Offline
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    Posted: Mar. 17 2004,9:25 pm QUOTE

Quote (Quinn @ Mar. 17 2004,9:34 pm)
A moving cache will do far less damage to the land it was placed in than a fixed location cache will.

I agree with this, too, in general. In the GeoPoker games I mentioned earlier, some games' players have taken to signalling other players that the cache is gone with a sign of three -- three sticks or three rocks or other objects that are already part of the local environment.

In one game, where the cache is always hidden in an urban setting, the sign of three is three pennies! They last long enough to signal other players, but sooner or later, some muggle always picks up after the Poker players!


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GeoRockers Offline
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Posted: Mar. 18 2004,11:08 am QUOTE

Hi NJ Approver,

Quote (NJ Approver @ Mar. 17 2004,8:30 am)
Went out to find my first navicache (the only one within 25 miles of me) today.


Welcome to Navicache! :wave


Quote (NJ Approver @ Mar. 17 2004,8:30 am)
It's listed as a traveling cache (50 states)I looked all over and it wasn't there.


There have been many caches placed in the central valley area of California, where the prize is the cache itself.

The first person or group to find the cache gets the entire cache. :)

The central valley area is also home to a lot of competitive cachers.   It is considered normal to have 10 teams attempting the first to find. :D

Locally, it has become a standard practice to include plastic survey tape among the cache items.  A small strip of tape is tied to a branch in order to flag the previous location of the cache.

Quote (Scout @ Mar. 17 2004,8:25 pm)
In one game, where the cache is always hidden in an urban setting, the sign of three is three pennies! They last long enough to signal other players, but sooner or later, some muggle always picks up after the Poker players!


:D

George


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A 1/1 via the trail around the hill?
Nah... that's too easy!  Let's go up and over!
Why follow a trail when we can blaze our own? :p

We *make* mountains out of mole hills!
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Renegade Knight Offline
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    Posted: April 08 2004,9:33 pm QUOTE

Quote (Scout @ Mar. 17 2004,9:25 pm)
...some games' players have taken to signalling other players that the cache is gone with a sign of three -- three sticks or three rocks or other objects that are already part of the local environment.

In one game, where the cache is always hidden in an urban setting, the sign of three is three pennies! They last long enough to signal other players, but sooner or later, some muggle always picks up after the Poker players!

I'm glad this topic has been developed further.  On GC when there was never really a concencus on what the sign should be.

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cacherunner Offline
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    Posted: April 12 2004,1:21 pm QUOTE

Hey, RK! Glad to see you over here, too! What we have done with travelling caches in the past (when they were allowed  ??? ), is to include a roll of flagging tape in the cache container. The finder then cuts a small piece of the tape off, marks it with the time and date found, and ties it near the cache area. This seems to work well, and eliminates unnecessary trampling. Just my .02  :cool:
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whiteurkel Offline
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    Posted: April 12 2004,3:42 pm QUOTE

Quote (Quinn @ Mar. 17 2004,10:34 pm)
By the way, I have seen in my area of upstate ny over 50 micro caches placed in a tight area by a single user in just a matter of weeks. these caches are sometimes no more than a small cup with a slip of paper in it just to call it a cache. caches like these when approved tend to do far more harm than anything else as they are more-so just clutter to both the lands and sites.

micro caches can be great fun if they are planned out to be so. But do not just dump one out in the world just so you can say you placed a cache.

Well, we have to be talking about the same microcaches, although several of them are in Pennsylvannia. I admit to finding one, but as they continued to pop up in the weekly cache notification, I found them rather disturbing :sick  
Especially since many are placed on private property (convenience stores, retail stores etc..) without permission.  :nono


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Mariner Offline
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Posted: April 13 2004,2:10 pm QUOTE

I think micros in general cause more environmental damage than any other type of cache, simply because it takes more searching to find them. Our traveling cache specifically asks the finder to put flagging tape very near the cache site, with their username and the time at which they removed/found the cache. That way, when I show up ten minutes later, I know how much I missed it by. (Yup, that has happened. A LOT. :rolleyes  )

These caches are great fun, and thanks to the admins here for hosting ours.

The limo rolls on.
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PC Medic Offline
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    Posted: April 13 2004,7:34 pm QUOTE

Not sure how we went from Moving caches to micros, but to bring things back on topic 'Cacherunner' has pointed out what is a perfect way to mark the cache is gone. It is also a good idea to perhaps log a 'Note' to a moving cache's page the morning you head out that you are on your way. This may act as an additioanl notice to others that they may be too late when they get their. Then when you find the cache and return home change your Note log to a Find.

Edited by PC Medic on April 13 2004,7:34 pm

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Mariner Offline
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    Posted: April 14 2004,10:26 pm QUOTE

Now there's a strange one. It never occured to me to NOT have some way of marking the site, so that if one finder takes the moving cache, then 3 others don't trash the cache site looking for an already traveling cache.

Hmmm..I might just have to apologize to some people on another site. Or maybe not.

I just can't imagine not having the old site marked. Besides, I spent 13 bucks for flagging tape, and 8 bucks for scissors just so that the finder COULD mark it. It has to be a good idea, or else I'm out $21. :D
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Szuchie Offline
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    Posted: Dec. 03 2007,9:41 am QUOTE

I'm new to navicaching (sort of), and am looking into the many things this site offers vs. others.  I enjoy seeking caches here, and like the alternatives navicache offers.  One of the things that struck my fancy was the concept of "Traveling Caches".  I guess after reading this thread I have a better idea on how they function...but I'm still have some questions.

For instance - if I "set free" a traveling cache, do I have to update the coordinates every time it is moved some place?  For example - someone moves it to XYZ coordinates.  Do they just post the coords in their log and people use them - or should I update the cache page coords to reflect the movement?  Not sure how that works...just curious as I like the idea, but would like some more education on it before I decide to place one of my own.

Thanks!

~Szuchie
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PC Medic Offline
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    Posted: Dec. 03 2007,2:16 pm QUOTE

Quote (Szuchie @ Dec. 03 2007,11:41 am)
For instance - if I "set free" a traveling cache, do I have to update the coordinates every time it is moved some place?  For example - someone moves it to XYZ coordinates.  Do they just post the coords in their log and people use them - or should I update the cache page coords to reflect the movement?  Not sure how that works...just curious as I like the idea, but would like some more education on it before I decide to place one of my own.

Thanks!

~Szuchie

Because only the cache owner has access to Edit a cache listing, you would need to update the coordinates each time the finder 'releases' the cache at its new location. This is needed in order for the cache mapping and search functions to remain accurate.

It is also important with moving/traveling caches that the finder post their FIND log entry ASAP indicating they have removed the cache from the posted location. When they place the cache they would post a NOTE log entry indicating it has been place with the new coordinates. You (the cache owner) would receive an automated email when they make the log entry and know when to change the listed coordinates. This means that each find /move will actually result in two seperate log entries.

For an example see This Cache which appears may have finally run its course.


Edited by PC Medic on Dec. 03 2007,2:25 pm

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Szuchie Offline
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    Posted: Dec. 03 2007,6:23 pm QUOTE

Quote (PC Medic @ Dec. 03 2007,4:16 pm)
Quote (Szuchie @ Dec. 03 2007,11:41 am)
For instance - if I "set free" a traveling cache, do I have to update the coordinates every time it is moved some place?  For example - someone moves it to XYZ coordinates.  Do they just post the coords in their log and people use them - or should I update the cache page coords to reflect the movement?  Not sure how that works...just curious as I like the idea, but would like some more education on it before I decide to place one of my own.

Thanks!

~Szuchie

Because only the cache owner has access to Edit a cache listing, you would need to update the coordinates each time the finder 'releases' the cache at its new location. This is needed in order for the cache mapping and search functions to remain accurate.

It is also important with moving/traveling caches that the finder post their FIND log entry ASAP indicating they have removed the cache from the posted location. When they place the cache they would post a NOTE log entry indicating it has been place with the new coordinates. You (the cache owner) would receive an automated email when they make the log entry and know when to change the listed coordinates. This means that each find /move will actually result in two seperate log entries.

For an example see This Cache which appears may have finally run its course.

That's excellent.  I just wanted to make sure that if I put a traveling cache out there, I was doing it properly.  

Thank you for the feedback!

~Szuchie
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